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News > Dawn of a New Era in Overhead Persistent Infrared Surveillance for National Security
Dawn of a New Era in Overhead Persistent Infrared Surveillance for National Security

Posted 5/5/2011   Updated 5/5/2011 Email story   Print story

    


Release Number: 010511

5/5/2011 - U.S. AIR FORCE SPACE AND MISSILE SYSTEMS CENTER, EL SEGUNDO, Calif. and CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, Fla. -- FIRST-OF-ITS-KIND U.S. AIR FORCE MISSILE WARNING SATELLITE LAUNCH SET FOR MAY 6 AT 2:14 PM EASTERN TIME FROM CAPE CANAVERAL AIR FORCE STATION, FLA.

Historic Launch of Most Technologically Advanced Military Infrared Satellite Ever Developed Will Deliver Highly Sophisticated Infrared Capabilities While Simultaneously Improving Nation's Missile Defense, Missile Warning, Technical Intelligence and Battlespace Awareness

Media Invited for Live Launch Onsite or Via Live Streaming Video
Interviews with U.S. Air Force Leaders; B-Roll, Video Footage and other Visuals Available Before, During and Following May 6 Satellite Launch


The first Space Based Infrared System geosynchronous spacecraft set for a Friday, May 6 launch at 2:14 p.m. EDT (11:14 a.m. PDT) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., aboard an Atlas V rocket is the most technologically advanced military infrared satellite ever developed. The spacecraft will deliver the most highly sophisticated infrared missile warning capabilities while simultaneously improving the nation's missile defense, technical intelligence and battlespace awareness.

"The enormous efforts toward the May 6 launch of this advanced SBIRS GEO-1 warning system are a testament to strong government-industry partnerships, hard work and dedication of the entire SBIRS team. We remain focused on achieving mission success for this critical program," says U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. (s) Roger Teague, director of the Space and Missile Systems Center's Infrared Space Systems Directorate.

"GEO-1 represents the dawn of a new era in overhead persistent infrared surveillance that will greatly improve our national security space architecture for years to come," adds Teague. "We look forward to getting this satellite on-orbit."

The SBIRS team is led by SMC's Infrared Space Systems Directorate. Lockheed Martin is the SBIRS prime contractor, with Northrop Grumman as the payload integrator. U.S. Air Force Space Command operates the SBIRS system.

SBIRS GEO-1 includes highly sophisticated scanning and staring sensors that will deliver improved infrared sensitivity and a reduction in area revisit times over the current constellation. The scanning sensor will provide a wide area surveillance of missile launches and natural phenomena across the earth, while the staring sensor will be used to observe smaller areas of interest with superior sensitivity. These dual independent sensors will enhance early warning of missile launches around the globe, support the nation's ballistic missile defense system, greatly expand our technical intelligence gathering capability, and bolster situational awareness for warfighters on the battlefield.

The SBIRS Program employs more than 9,700 personnel across 23 states, and works in partnership with more than 50 large and small businesses, providing a multitude of parts for the construction, integration and launch of the payloads and ground facilities.

"The SBIRS payload is built in Azusa, Calif., with the satellite integrated in Sunnyvale, Calif.," explains Teague. "SBIRS satellites are launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., and the satellites will be operated by Air Force crews in Colorado. All across these locations are thousands of people at work daily, designing, building and integrating key systems and assemblies for the Space Based Infrared System. Internationally, the SBIRS program employs hundreds of people specializing in payload component production and sustainment of our crucial Relay Ground Stations. Just as our domestic suppliers and their employees, our international partners continue to proudly represent critical assets to the SBIRS program."

The SBIRS launch will be carried live beginning 20 minutes prior to the May 6 launch at 2:14 pm EDT, concluding approximately 45 minutes following launch. A simulcast of the broadcast can be viewed at http://www.ulalaunch.com/site/pages/Multimedia_Webcast.shtml.

Satellite Coordinates
ALL TIMES EASTERN DAYLIGHT TIME
MAY 6, 2011 TEST - 1:00 P.M.
BARS AND TONE - 1:23 P.M.
BROADCAST START - 1:54 P.M.
LAUNCH WINDOW - 2:14 - 2:54 P.M.
END TRANSMISSION: 3:45 P.M.
SATELLITE - AMC 3
TRANSPONDER - 16C
BAND - C-BAND ANALOG
ORBITAL POSITION - 87 DEGREES W
CARRIER - SES AMERICOM
BANDWIDTH - 36 MHz
UPLINK FREQ - 6245 MHz (Horizontal)
DOWNLINK FREQ - 4020 MHz (Vertical)

Media representatives can submit questions for response regarding this topic by sending an e-mail to smcpa.media@gmail.com
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Get the latest Los Angeles Air Force Base News at www.losangeles.af.mil
'Space and Missile Systems Center - Building the Future of Military Space Today'



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