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The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory engineering team stands in front of the Operationally Responsive Space (ORS)-5 satellite in the MIT LL clean room at the Lexington, Massachusetts facility, prior to shipment for final processing and stacking atop an Orbital ATK Minotaur IV launch vehicle at Launch Complex 46, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. From left to right: Joe Warfel - Assembly Technician; Michele Weatherwax - Mechanical Engineer; Al Pillsbury - Mechanical Engineer; Marshall Solomon - Thermal Engineer, and; Eui Lee - Thermal Engineer. (Courtesy photo: MIT LL)
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ORS-5 Mission Logo
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The engineering team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, Massachusetts perform a light leak test on the Operationally Responsive Space (ORS)-5 satellite prior to shipment for launch. ORS-5, also known as SensorSat, is a single satellite constellation with a primary mission to provide space situational awareness. It will operate from a low (zero degree inclination) orbit 372 miles above the earth to aid the U.S. military's tracking of other satellites and space debris in geosynchronous orbit, commonly used by defense-related communications satellites, television broadcasting stations, and international space platforms 22,236 miles above the equator. (Photo: MIT LL)
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ORS-5, also known as SensorSat, is a single satellite constellation with a primary mission to provide space situational awareness. It measures about five feet long, two and a half feet wide, and weighs about 250 pounds. It will operate from a low, zero inclination orbit approximately 372 miles above the earth to aid the U.S. military's tracking of other satellites and space debris in geosynchronous orbit, 22,236 miles above the equator, commonly used by defense-related communications satellites, television broadcasting stations, and international space platforms. (Courtesy photo: MIT LL)
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The Operationally Responsive Space (ORS)-5 satellite, also known as SensorSat, undergoes thermal vacuum testing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, Massachusetts prior to shipment for processing and integration atop an Orbital ATK Minotaur IV launch vehicle. Scheduled for launch on Aug. 25, 2017, ORS-5 is a single satellite constellation with a primary mission to provide space situational awareness at a significantly reduced cost compared to larger, more complex satellites.  (Courtesy photo: MIT LL)
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Col. Tom Haig, the first DMSP director. He retired from the Air Force in 1968. (US Air Force Photo)
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Dr. Stephen Pluntze, Remote Sensing Systems Directorate deputy director and former director of the Defense Weather Systems Directorate presents a sun sensor detector from the final DMSP satellite to retired Air Force Colonel Tom Haig.  The colonel was the first DMSP director in 1961. (Courtesy photo)
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Tech. Sgt. Gregory Reid from the 61st Communications Squadron and a volunteer with the “Rising Six” service group at the Space and Missile Systems Center, prepares to serve the first of nearly 750 attendees during a “Burger Burn” as part of the annual Armed Forces Retiree Appreciation Day, June 3, 2017, at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California. (U.S. Air Force photo/ James Spellman, Jr.)
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Karen Austin (center), Space and Missile Systems Center Historian, takes on the herculean task of leading three back-to-back tours of the SMC Missile Heritage Center for retirees and their guests during the annual Armed Forces Retiree Appreciation Day, June 3, 2017, at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California. (U.S. Air Force photo/ James Spellman, Jr.)
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Col. Charles Roberts, commander of the 61st Air Base Group, chats with David Decker, a Navy veteran and volunteer with the Retiree Activities Office at Los Angeles Air Force Base during the annual Armed Forces Retiree Appreciation Day, held June 3, 2017. (U.S. Air Force photo/Joseph Juarez, Sr.)
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Retired Chief Master Sgt. Bryan V. Blue, Community Support Coordinator for Los Angeles Air Force Base, gives a briefing on resilience to attendees of the Armed Forces Retiree Appreciation Day June 3, 2017 (U.S. Air Force photo/James Spellman, Jr.)
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Col. (Dr.) Paul Hoerner, commander of the 61st Medical Squadron, chats with a retired Marine in the Gordon Conference Center during the annual Armed Forces Retiree Appreciation Day, held June 3, 2017 at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California. (U.S. Air Force photo/James Spellman, Jr.)
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Retirees from all branches of military service and their guests make their way around the various vendor tables in the Gordon Conference Center during the annual Armed Forces Retiree Appreciation Day, June 3, 2017, at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California. (U.S. Air Force photo/James Spellman, Jr.)
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A Juno PTV, provided by the Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles Air Force Base in El Segundo, California, successfully launched from the U.S. Army's Fort Wingate near Gallup, New Mexico Dec. 10. The target missile soared high into the atmosphere on its way to the White Sands Missile Range to be intercepted by a Patriot Advanced Capability Three (PAC-3). SMC's Rocket Systems Launch Program and its mission partners re-utilizes excess motors from Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles for U.S. government research, development, test and evaluation efforts. The Patriot Target Vehicle, also known as Juno, incorporates two solid rocket motors from the LGM-30F Minuteman II weapon system which was retired in 1994. (U.S. Army photo/White Sands Missile Range)
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A Falcon 9 lifts off from the pad. (SpaceX photo)
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GPS Satellite
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